Tata Harper Resurfacing Mask

tata-harper-resurfacing-mask Here’s the thing; natural is not always best. You should know this by now, but some brands (ahem Tata Harper) enjoy creating loyal followers by scaring them into believing everything except their brand will kill you. ‘Non-toxic’ they say, ‘no chemicals’. The problem is that toxicity is dosage-based; ingest one Aspirin and you will be fine, ingest a handful and you will end up somewhere unfortunate. Much the same goes for skincare ingredients; many are dangerous at high concentrations, so companies use them at low concentrations where they are perfectly safe on human skin. Oh and chemical-free? A living organism, like a blueberry, has hundreds of chemicals inside of it; smothering it on your face actually introduces far more chemicals to your skin than a synthetic-based product which isolates specific chemicals which have a benefit to the skin. I truly hope that the more natural-inclined brands will stop scaring the public into buying their products, and instead would build their brand on fact.

Marketing aside: Tata Harper. Most of their products I cannot use because I am rather sensitive to essential oils, but the masks are brilliant. On a slow day I like to apply Purifying Mask first to draw out excess oil and remove any pollution particulates, then follow with Resurfacing Mask to gently exfoliate. I have an upcoming post on the Purifying Mask, but I thought I would start with my favourite of the two.

Purpose

Minimize pores and give skin a good glow.

What’s so special about it?

83% organic, no essential oils except for Tata’s natural aroma, a soothing base of aloe instead of water, and a nice blend of hydrating and exfoliating ingredients to keep skin in balance.

How does it work?

Willow bark extract and meadowsweet act as BHAs, pomegranate enzymes smooth away rough texture, a base of aloe soothes and hydrates, pink clay minimizes the appearance of pores, beet extract improves the tone of skin, and lactobacillus ferment is a probiotic that theoretically balances skin.

How often would I use it?

I use it weekly, left on for fifteen minutes, after Tata Harper Purifying Mask. I follow with a retinoid, but it is up to your skin’s level of sensitivity. I would have no qualms in recommending this to sensitive skin because of the aloe base and relatively gentle ingredients.

Results and thoughts

Ah, Tata; you spoil me with this one. When I told a friend I was about to use this mask after Purifying she said “oh great, get that nice hydration!” and I was utterly confused. But this is an exfoliating mask? Hydration? But then I remembered the ingredients, and it all makes sense; the reason I love the way my skin looks after this mask is because of the ingenious mixture of aloe (hydrating), pink clay (purifying), BHAs (exfoliating), and enzymes (exfoliating). It is honestly a bevy of masks in one treatment, and does it all rather brilliantly. No this is not going to replace a hard-core acid peel, and no it will not banish your blackheads in one use, but what it will do is leave your skin plump, smooth, and a bit more radiant than it was before. My only qualm with this is the added fragrance and the price. Yes the fragrance is natural, but I have such doubts that its inclusion is necessary and I would feel better knowing it was free of any added ingredients. And at $77 CDN for 1 ounce this is an incredibly expensive face mask, especially when one considers Tata’s recommendation of a ‘thick layer’. That being said this is a regular in my routine, so I suppose none of my qualms seem to matter.

Find Tata Harper Resurfacing Mask at Sephora.

Disclaimer: The product mentioned in this post was given to me free of charge. I receive countless products each month, and say nothing about the majority of them; I will only review a product if I think it is worthy of words, either negative or positive. Links are to the easiest and most common retailer. All opinions are my own and do not reflect those of the companies mentioned, nor my employer.

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Drunk Elephant

The skincare industry’s darling, Drunk Elephant; a starlet in bloom. A year ago I bought most of the collection, threw everything else in a box, and went all-in. I ate well, paid attention to my skin, and cut out everything that was not Drunk Elephant. My skin should have been brilliant, but I saw no notable difference over those three months than when I was using a hodgepodge of products from a bevy of brands. No miracle came, and so I tossed Drunk Elephant aside. A few months ago I was given even more of the collection to try, and thought that this concoction of products may be more successful. Unsurprisingly it was not, and I developed more blemishes than usual which lasted longer and healed slower.

Products mentioned:
– Drunk Elephant C-Firma Day Serum* (DE, Sephora, Dermstore)
– Drunk Elephant T.L.C. Framboos Glycolic Night Serum* (DE, Sephora, Dermstore)
– Drunk Elephant Beste Jelly Cleanser (DE, Sephora)
– Drunk Elephant B-Hydra Intensive Hydration Gel* (DE, Sephora, Dermstore)
– Drunk Elephant Virgin Marula Luxury Face Oil* (DE, Sephora, Dermstore)
– Drunk Elephant Lala Retro Whipped Cream* (DE, Sephora, Dermstore)
– Drunk Elephant Shaba Complex Eye Serum* (DE, Sephora, Dermstore)

C-Firma Day Serum

A potent blend on paper—with 15% L-ascorbic acid, 5% ferulic acid, and 1% vitamin E—this was my first true foray into the world of vitamin C. I have post-inflammatory erythema (PIE) rather than post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH); red marks rather than brown marks. Vitamin C is notably effective at reducing hyperpigmentation through disrupting melanin, however I have seen no conclusive evidence to suggest it corrects PIE. Despite this, Drunk Elephant does recommend C-Firma as a corrective treatment for acne scars. I saw no level of advanced correction with regards to my PIE, in fact I believe C-Firma was contributing to my extra blemishes as within a week of stopping they seemed to fade in severity. If your issue is PIH with no active blemishes, perhaps this would work for you; otherwise, I fail to see any benefit.

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T.L.C. Framboos Glycolic Night Serum

The iconic Drunk Elephant product, T.L.C. is another potent product: glycolic, salicylic, citric, lactic, tartaric acids plus calming, anti-inflammatory, and hydrating ingredients like marula oil, cactus extract, and sodium hyaluronate crosspolymer. Perhaps this was just not enough for me, or perhaps it was too much, but I find my skin responds far better to retinoids than constant acid application. A common misunderstanding with acne suffers is that skin cells are being turned over too slowly, when in fact it is the opposite; elevated levels of hormones cause quicker skin cell turnover from the basal layer, which are then not sloughed away quick enough, and thus form blockages. Acids in theory clear these skin cells away faster, allowing them to be pushed through naturally. What would be more effective though, would be to regulate the level of skin cell turnover to begin with; retinoids do that. So on a theoretical level, this level of exfoliation daily is rather excessive for most people and you may see far more effective results with a retinoid paired with a more gentle means of exfoliation.

Beste Jelly Cleanser

A welcome addition to the Drunk Elephant family, I bought this as soon as I saw it but after a few weeks of using it I have still yet to develop a strong opinion. The formulation is very clinical, with only a bit of cantaloupe, marula oil, and aloe thrown in from nature. The surfactants used are modern and the pH is slightly acidic at around 6. Beste has a sticky clear gel texture which makes the cap being on the bottom rather annoying; it runs a wee bit after closing. On the skin it has a good creamy lather, and skin absolutely feels clean after rinsing. What gives me hesitation is how tight skin can feel after using it; a hydrating essence is an absolute must and when I tried it for a week without one my skin was raw along my jaw and I developed a nasty bit of blemishes which I recognize on myself as stemming from dehydration. While this is gentler than the bar cleansers, I find that using this means adding another hydrating product to compensate and that seems a tad bit excessive.

B-Hydra Intensive Hydration Gel

A medium-weight serum to better enable the skin to hold water, B-Hydra is an interesting concept that needs greater clarification on the packaging. This is not a moisturizer, this is a serum; you need to pair something with it. I am not sure if someone with oily skin would need to because in theory they produce their own oil-based occlusive barrier, but everyone else needs to mix this with an oil like Marula Oil or a moisturizer like Lala. I tried both and found the Marula Oil and B-Hydra combination to be the most effective. My skin felt comfortable, foundation application went brilliantly on days I wore it, and my skin better tolerated T.L.C. application in the evening. That being said, I have still not received a satisfactory answer as to how ‘coconut alkanes’ differ from coconut oil, and it could have been something else in my routine but I did notice more severity in blemishes when including this into my routine.

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Virgin Marula Luxury Face Oil

‘Luxury’ as a descriptor is a tad bit much for my taste, but this is a brilliant oil. It is more heavy on oleic acids, which means it is far more effective at hydrating than at balancing, but its small molecular size apparently means it is not very comedogenic. It blends wonderfully into B-Hydra, and is unlike any other carrier oil I have tried in fluidity; it glides on the skin and skins in so easily. I enjoyed this face oil, and will continue to use it as a booster in the cold winter months and on summer nights when the air is dry.

Lala Retro Whipped Cream

A tragic product for anyone but a connoisseur of heavy creams, this blend of six whipped oils is a neat concept but heavy, occlusive, and greasy on my skin. Beyond that, my skin would flush and burn upon application which I have been told is due to the inclusion of yeast in the formula though I cannot confirm that. All in all, this is for the person who would be comfortable with the original Nivea cream on their face. A strong pass for me.

Shaba Complex Eye Serum

Ah now this is brilliant. I rarely find an eye product that I find performant, but this is a true treat. It has a lightweight creamy texture which blends easily into skin, and no detectable scent which I prefer around the eye area. Black tea ferment, copper peptides, edelweiss, niacinamide, ubiquinone, citrus fruit bioflavonoid, sea buckthorn oil, and sodium hyaluronate crosspolymer all work to relax the eye area, soften fine lines, reduce the appearance of dark circles, and improve texture. I find most eye creams overpromise and underdeliver, but I notice smoother dehydration lines and a brighter look to the undereye area.

All things considered, the entire brand is a pass for me. The prices are far too high for the ingredients in play here, and the packaging is tired and reminiscent of decoration for a sad birthday party that nobody attended. But beyond all of that, it annoys me to no end the manner in which the Drunk Elephant social team prides itself on being greater than any other brand in the industry. This is not the ‘one and done’ collection they sell themselves as; it is a curated selection of products that are mostly good, but far from innovative. Good acids can be found from NeoStrata; good vitamin C is being done by Dr. Dennis Gross, Algenist and Perricone; modern cleansers are gentle and pH-balanced; night creams are a dime-a-dozen; and even Neutrogena has figured out hydrating serums. All Drunk Elephant has done is make the work easier for you, but that costs you more and it comes with your buy-in of their holier-than-thou attitude.

Disclaimer: Products marked with an asterisk (*) were given to me free of charge. I receive countless products each month, and say nothing about the majority of them; I will only review a product if I think it is worthy of words, either negative or positive. Links are to the easiest and most common retailer. All opinions are my own and do not reflect those of the companies mentioned, nor my employer.

Skincare Journal No. 5

Back at it again with the Drunk Elephant, I have been trailing a few different products from the line these past three weeks in a follow-up to my original post. This time it’s been about C-Firma Day Serum*, T.L.C Framboos Glycolic Night Serum*, and Marula Oil*. This is my first proper trial of a vitamin C product (the first was a dalliance with Indeed Laboratories C24) and my goal is to drench my skin in antioxidants while correcting post-inflammatory hyper-pigmentation. I am using T.L.C as a night serum, alternating with Differin, in an effort to correct surface irregularities. As a final step, a little layer of Marula Oil. How this compares to The Ordinary Marula Oil still alludes me, mostly because I haven’t any idea whether Deciem’s is unrefined and I am sceptical as to whether or not they would even know for certain. An overall glance at my routine:

AM: Dior Hydra Life Lotion to Foam Fresh Cleanser, Drunk Elephant Shaba Complex Eye Serum*, Drunk Elephant C-Firma Day Serum* mixed with Drunk Elephant B-Hydra*, Drunk Elephant Marula Oil*.

PM: Dior Hydra Life Lotion to Foam Fresh Cleanser, Drunk Elephant Shaba Complex Eye Serum*, Drunk Elephant T.L.C Framboos Glycolic Night Serum* OR Differin Gel, wait twenty minutes, Drunk Elephant Marula Oil* mixed with Drunk Elephant B-Hydra*.

First impressions after three weeks:

– C-Firma gives a good instant glow to the skin, though I am always sceptical of vitamin C’s ability to correct red post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation.
– T.L.C. is potent and fantastic at reducing inflammatory acne; I love it as a spot treatment during the day.
– B-Hydra is nice, though I do not see a major difference using it when I already use the day and night serums.
– Shaba is pricey for what it is, though it is fantastic at plumping dehydration lines and making me look a bit more awake than I really am.
– Marula Oil is lightweight but intensely soothing.

Disclaimer: Products marked with an asterisk (*) were given to me free of charge. I receive countless products each month, and say nothing about the majority of them; I will only review a product if I think it is worthy of words, either negative or positive. Links are to the easiest and most common retailer. All opinions are my own and do not reflect those of the companies mentioned, nor my employer.

Lancer Method

lancer-skincare

What is it?

A clinical skincare system for glow.

What did I try?

The Method: Polish, The Method: Cleanse, Retexturizing Treatment Cream Glycolic Acid 10x, The Method: Nourish.

What is the key ingredient?

The Method: Polish – quartz and sodium bicarbonate crystals (physical exfoliant), pumpkin and pomegranate enzymes (chemical exfoliant), brown sea algae (globally corrective).
The Method: Cleanse – sodium PCA (pH-balancing), rice protein (softening), amino acids (hydrating).
Retexturizing Treatment Cream Glycolic Acid 10x – glycolic acid (resurfacing), CoQ10 (antioxidant), phospholipids (hydrating).
The Method: Nourish – nasturtium flower extract (glow), hexapeptide 48 (treats fine lines), polyphenol (antioxidant).
Continue reading “Lancer Method”

Skincare Journal No. 3

Nearly a year ago I purchased most of the Drunk Elephant collection. Everything else went away into a box, and I went all-in. I was impressed by how each product seemed to leave skin comfortable for the next, and the result was skin with a bit more balance to it than my typical hodgepodge of active ingredients, products, and brands. The Pekee and Juju cleansing bars are a bit too much for twice-daily use, so I suggest Pekee every evening and Juju twice a week; splash your face with tepid water in the morning. B-Hydra was hydrating and plumping, and T.L.C. was brilliant at tackling texture and small blemishes. I now have Lala*, and find it far too heavy for twice daily use; once in a while it’s a comforting treat. Overall the line is a tad bit expensive for what it is, but the formulas are great and the philosophy of simplicity is one I can get behind.

Disclaimer: Products marked with an asterisk (*) were given to me free of charge. I receive countless products each month, and say nothing about the majority of them; I will only review a product if I think it is worthy of words, either negative or positive. Links are to the easiest and most common retailer. All opinions are my own and do not reflect those of the companies mentioned, nor my employer.

Skincare Journal No. 1

A different format, one where I can spend less time on aesthetics and more time on sharing my thoughts on the newest products in the beauty and skincare industry.

I have taken another look at Tata Harper. In the morning I have been experimenting with the Purifying and Regenerating cleansers, and I now remember how much I enjoyed using them last year. Purifying gives a deep clean with a light lemon scent, while Regenerating leaves my skin rather luminous. Neither would make for a great twice-daily cleanse for anyone but the most oily of skins; instead I would alternate them with a gentle oil cleanse (perhaps the Nourishing Oil Cleanser). As for the Rejuvenating Serum, I have been using it in the morning as a moisturizer. It hydrates and illuminates brilliantly. Every other day I have been using the Resurfacing Mask, which has sloughed away any rough texture resulting from my retinol. Tata is a great brand to consider if skincare is an experience for you, and you value naturals.